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Friday, 10 December 2010

How to deal with student rioters

Well they should be arrested and charged first of all (that goes without saying) and prosecuted and then fined when found guilty.

Upto £9,000 per conviction.  Of course most students will be unable to pay the but Government fine loans would be provided in full to meet the cost of the fines so there would be no upfront costs. Graduates would start repaying their fine loans once their salary reached £21,000. Once they reach this level, repayments would be set at nine per cent of income over £21,000. Loans would accrue interest at the rate of inflation while graduates earn less than the threshold, but after that the rate would be set at a rate over inflation.

6 comments:

Odin's Raven said...

A better and less bureaucratic solution could be simply to machine gun all these rioters or 'demonstrators'. The police could then identify and inter their associates who put them up to causing violent disturbances. Naturally the lefty media and political class would not like it, and there would be some more riots- but hey, there sould be enough bullets left to give them each a Christmas present at a time of goodwill, and the dead don't come back to riot again!

Steven_L said...

What gets me Alex is how they are up in arms about a debt of £27k for a university education, yet don't seem to care they would need to take on 4 times that to 'get on the property ladder' and buy a small flat.

The British are mad!

Alex said...

Well its £27k + quite a bit more, and it is a debt that earlier bgenerations did not incur. i left Cambridge 30 years ago completely debt-free, and walked straight into a choice of jobs. Today's graduates, even the best, can expect internships and, if they are lucky, a job, but they will look unattractive hires if their employers figure they need paying more to pay off their debts.

Infnordz said...

The government picked an easy target, Universities and University students, because they are such sad, baby, "scaredy cat", cowards that they won't butcher all the blubber off the morbidly obese NHS!

@Odin's Raven
There are not enough bullets; read "Art of War" by Sun Tzu.
It would be better to limit the national number of university places, by merit; partially by closing the lowest quality universities, and killing poor value courses, then degrees regain their value, and Universities education becomes more affordable, for the state, without higher student fees.

I had to pay a much lower rate of interest on my student loan after university, in the 90's, so their debt will grow much faster, so more fuel for their rage!

Drop-out University students (e.g. due to money problems) will have a worse credit rating, so end up as greater liabilities to the economy, and probably require the state to write-off a higher percentage of loans, thus not save the state much, if any, money.

@Steve_L
Get real; 4 times earnings mortgages won't be available for much longer, let-alone effective 100% mortgages; the higher deposits and student loan payments will keep many students out of housing until much older, (e.g. an extra decade), especially if they have to pay as high rents as now rent!

Can we understand their rage now?

Alex said...

@Infnordz

Interesting but what will really hapen is that when they get political power 25 years from now today's students will cut the pensions of those older than them.

Infnordz said...

@Alex
I wouldn't blame anyone dropping the Pensioners, like a dead weight; the ratio of old to young will become unsustainable!

I wouldn't worry about 25 years time, the state pensions is already dying, that's why the coalition government are already fiddling with it, and will effectively force everyone to have a private or pseudo-private pension!

I realised the above, so am I'm stuffing my private pension with money as fast as I reasonably can, and adjusting fund allocation every quarter, as required; it goes without say that this included the 2'nd pension op-out money, so I'm quite p'd off that the second pension opt-out dies soon, in favour of the states' nonsense.

I'm also buying Allocated Bullion as fast as I can, because it is one of the few ways to preserve my savings, 'make' some fiat money, and act as lossless private insurance.


The only way to fix the root cause of this is mess is to recognise that a money system based on debt money, fractional reserve debt, and usury is fatally flawed; money must be based on a fixed ratio to something stable and valuable e.g. Bullion.

I find it absurd that some recently claimed, in the Observer, that Margaret Thatcher used Austrian Economics; how could she really, when the UK and the world still used fractional-reserve fiat money?